• Disorder in the Court (Episode 15)

    The Stooges are key witnesses at a murder trial. Their friend and colleague, Gail Tempest (Suzanne Kaaren), is a dancer at the Black Bottom cafe where the Stooges are musicians. She is accused of killing Kirk Robin (a play on 'Who Killed Cock Robin?'). When the Stooges are called to the witness stand, they are nowhere to be found. The defense attorney (Bud Jamison) goes out into the hall only to find the Stooges playing jacks and tic-tac-toe simultaneously on the floor. After considerable mutual frustration, the court finally swears in Curly, who begins to describe the events that took place on the night of the murder. He offers to show the court exactly what happened. The Stooges and Tempest are part of a musical act; and the Stooges break into their musical routine to prove this, with Larry on violin, Moe on harmonica, and Curly on both spoons and upright bass. Written by Felix Adler. Directed by Preston Black. Original air date: May 30, 1936.

  • Brideless Groom (Episode 101)

    Shemp plays a voice instructor and the object of affection to tone-deaf vocal student Miss Dinkelmeyer (Dee Green), with Larry his musical accompanist. After an excruciating session, Moe enters his classroom to tell Shemp that his uncle had died and left him an inheritance of $500,000. However, Shemp cannot collect the money unless he is married (which horrifies Shemp) within 48 hours after the reading of the will, leaving him only a few hours. Shemp uses his filled-up black address book to propose to any and all women he has ever known, with unsuccessful results. With time running out, Moe and Larry lead Shemp through a series of disastrous situations including the destruction of a phone booth and Shemp being beaten silly by a woman named Miss Hopkins (Christine McIntyre), who had just moved into the building and mistook Shemp for her cousin Basil. Upon recovering from his bruising, Shemp unintentionally proposes to his unattractive and tone-deaf student Miss Dinkelmeyer. Written by Clyde Bruckman. Directed by Edward Bernds. Original air date: September 11, 1947.

  • Sing a Song of Six Pants (Episode 102)

    The Stooges run a tailor shop that is about to be repossessed by the Skin and Flint Finance Corporation. When the Boys hear about a big reward for fugitive bank robber Terry 'Slippery Fingered' Hargan (Harold Brauer), they think that catching him might end their financial woes. Hargan conveniently ducks into their shop as the officer (Vernon Dent) enters and leaves a suit with a safe combination in its pocket. After his girlfriend (Virginia Hunter) fails to retrieve the combination, Hargan returns with his henchmen, and a wild mêlée follows. The Stooges miss out on the reward but wind up with the crook's bankroll to pay off their debts. Written by Felix Adler. Directed by Jules White. Original air date: October 30, 1947.

  • Malice in the Palace (Episode 117)

    The Stooges are running the Cafe Casbah Bah (a Middle Eastern restaurant) and attempting to prepare a meal for customers Hassan Ben Sober (Vernon Dent) and Ginna Rumma (George J. Lewis). The meal turns out disastrous: their spaghetti dinner is spilled all over the customers' faces, so the stooges offer them a replacement meal: rabbit and hot dogs. Because a stray cat and dog make noises at inopportune times while Larry prepares the meal, Larry's meal appears to be actual dog and cat meat, which brings Moe and Shemp great grief when ordered to eat it by their customers. Written by Felix Adler. Directed by Jules White. Original air date: September 1, 1949.

  • Brideless Groom (Episode 101)

    Shemp plays a voice instructor and the object of affection to tone-deaf vocal student Miss Dinkelmeyer (Dee Green), with Larry his musical accompanist. After an excruciating session, Moe enters his classroom to tell Shemp that his uncle had died and left him an inheritance of $500,000. However, Shemp cannot collect the money unless he is married (which horrifies Shemp) within 48 hours after the reading of the will, leaving him only a few hours. Shemp uses his filled-up black address book to propose to any and all women he has ever known, with unsuccessful results. With time running out, Moe and Larry lead Shemp through a series of disastrous situations including the destruction of a phone booth and Shemp being beaten silly by a woman named Miss Hopkins (Christine McIntyre), who had just moved into the building and mistook Shemp for her cousin Basil. Upon recovering from his bruising, Shemp unintentionally proposes to his unattractive and tone-deaf student Miss Dinkelmeyer. Written by Clyde Bruckman. Directed by Edward Bernds. Original air date: September 11, 1947.

  • Sing a Song of Six Pants (Episode 102)

    The Stooges run a tailor shop that is about to be repossessed by the Skin and Flint Finance Corporation. When the Boys hear about a big reward for fugitive bank robber Terry 'Slippery Fingered' Hargan (Harold Brauer), they think that catching him might end their financial woes. Hargan conveniently ducks into their shop as the officer (Vernon Dent) enters and leaves a suit with a safe combination in its pocket. After his girlfriend (Virginia Hunter) fails to retrieve the combination, Hargan returns with his henchmen, and a wild mêlée follows. The Stooges miss out on the reward but wind up with the crook's bankroll to pay off their debts. Written by Felix Adler. Directed by Jules White. Original air date: October 30, 1947.

  • Malice in the Palace (Episode 117)

    The Stooges are running the Cafe Casbah Bah (a Middle Eastern restaurant) and attempting to prepare a meal for customers Hassan Ben Sober (Vernon Dent) and Ginna Rumma (George J. Lewis). The meal turns out disastrous: their spaghetti dinner is spilled all over the customers' faces, so the stooges offer them a replacement meal: rabbit and hot dogs. Because a stray cat and dog make noises at inopportune times while Larry prepares the meal, Larry's meal appears to be actual dog and cat meat, which brings Moe and Shemp great grief when ordered to eat it by their customers. Written by Felix Adler. Directed by Jules White. Original air date: September 1, 1949.

  • Disorder in the Court (Episode 15)

    The Stooges are key witnesses at a murder trial. Their friend and colleague, Gail Tempest (Suzanne Kaaren), is a dancer at the Black Bottom cafe where the Stooges are musicians. She is accused of killing Kirk Robin (a play on 'Who Killed Cock Robin?'). When the Stooges are called to the witness stand, they are nowhere to be found. The defense attorney (Bud Jamison) goes out into the hall only to find the Stooges playing jacks and tic-tac-toe simultaneously on the floor. After considerable mutual frustration, the court finally swears in Curly, who begins to describe the events that took place on the night of the murder. He offers to show the court exactly what happened. The Stooges and Tempest are part of a musical act; and the Stooges break into their musical routine to prove this, with Larry on violin, Moe on harmonica, and Curly on both spoons and upright bass. Written by Felix Adler. Directed by Preston Black. Original air date: May 30, 1936.

  • Sing a Song of Six Pants (Episode 102)

    The Stooges run a tailor shop that is about to be repossessed by the Skin and Flint Finance Corporation. When the Boys hear about a big reward for fugitive bank robber Terry 'Slippery Fingered' Hargan (Harold Brauer), they think that catching him might end their financial woes. Hargan conveniently ducks into their shop as the officer (Vernon Dent) enters and leaves a suit with a safe combination in its pocket. After his girlfriend (Virginia Hunter) fails to retrieve the combination, Hargan returns with his henchmen, and a wild mêlée follows. The Stooges miss out on the reward but wind up with the crook's bankroll to pay off their debts. Written by Felix Adler. Directed by Jules White. Original air date: October 30, 1947.

  • Malice in the Palace (Episode 117)

    The Stooges are running the Cafe Casbah Bah (a Middle Eastern restaurant) and attempting to prepare a meal for customers Hassan Ben Sober (Vernon Dent) and Ginna Rumma (George J. Lewis). The meal turns out disastrous: their spaghetti dinner is spilled all over the customers' faces, so the stooges offer them a replacement meal: rabbit and hot dogs. Because a stray cat and dog make noises at inopportune times while Larry prepares the meal, Larry's meal appears to be actual dog and cat meat, which brings Moe and Shemp great grief when ordered to eat it by their customers. Written by Felix Adler. Directed by Jules White. Original air date: September 1, 1949.

  • Disorder in the Court (Episode 15)

    The Stooges are key witnesses at a murder trial. Their friend and colleague, Gail Tempest (Suzanne Kaaren), is a dancer at the Black Bottom cafe where the Stooges are musicians. She is accused of killing Kirk Robin (a play on 'Who Killed Cock Robin?'). When the Stooges are called to the witness stand, they are nowhere to be found. The defense attorney (Bud Jamison) goes out into the hall only to find the Stooges playing jacks and tic-tac-toe simultaneously on the floor. After considerable mutual frustration, the court finally swears in Curly, who begins to describe the events that took place on the night of the murder. He offers to show the court exactly what happened. The Stooges and Tempest are part of a musical act; and the Stooges break into their musical routine to prove this, with Larry on violin, Moe on harmonica, and Curly on both spoons and upright bass. Written by Felix Adler. Directed by Preston Black. Original air date: May 30, 1936.

  • Brideless Groom (Episode 101)

    Shemp plays a voice instructor and the object of affection to tone-deaf vocal student Miss Dinkelmeyer (Dee Green), with Larry his musical accompanist. After an excruciating session, Moe enters his classroom to tell Shemp that his uncle had died and left him an inheritance of $500,000. However, Shemp cannot collect the money unless he is married (which horrifies Shemp) within 48 hours after the reading of the will, leaving him only a few hours. Shemp uses his filled-up black address book to propose to any and all women he has ever known, with unsuccessful results. With time running out, Moe and Larry lead Shemp through a series of disastrous situations including the destruction of a phone booth and Shemp being beaten silly by a woman named Miss Hopkins (Christine McIntyre), who had just moved into the building and mistook Shemp for her cousin Basil. Upon recovering from his bruising, Shemp unintentionally proposes to his unattractive and tone-deaf student Miss Dinkelmeyer. Written by Clyde Bruckman. Directed by Edward Bernds. Original air date: September 11, 1947.

  • Malice in the Palace (Episode 117)

    The Stooges are running the Cafe Casbah Bah (a Middle Eastern restaurant) and attempting to prepare a meal for customers Hassan Ben Sober (Vernon Dent) and Ginna Rumma (George J. Lewis). The meal turns out disastrous: their spaghetti dinner is spilled all over the customers' faces, so the stooges offer them a replacement meal: rabbit and hot dogs. Because a stray cat and dog make noises at inopportune times while Larry prepares the meal, Larry's meal appears to be actual dog and cat meat, which brings Moe and Shemp great grief when ordered to eat it by their customers. Written by Felix Adler. Directed by Jules White. Original air date: September 1, 1949.

  • Disorder in the Court (Episode 15)

    The Stooges are key witnesses at a murder trial. Their friend and colleague, Gail Tempest (Suzanne Kaaren), is a dancer at the Black Bottom cafe where the Stooges are musicians. She is accused of killing Kirk Robin (a play on 'Who Killed Cock Robin?'). When the Stooges are called to the witness stand, they are nowhere to be found. The defense attorney (Bud Jamison) goes out into the hall only to find the Stooges playing jacks and tic-tac-toe simultaneously on the floor. After considerable mutual frustration, the court finally swears in Curly, who begins to describe the events that took place on the night of the murder. He offers to show the court exactly what happened. The Stooges and Tempest are part of a musical act; and the Stooges break into their musical routine to prove this, with Larry on violin, Moe on harmonica, and Curly on both spoons and upright bass. Written by Felix Adler. Directed by Preston Black. Original air date: May 30, 1936.

  • Brideless Groom (Episode 101)

    Shemp plays a voice instructor and the object of affection to tone-deaf vocal student Miss Dinkelmeyer (Dee Green), with Larry his musical accompanist. After an excruciating session, Moe enters his classroom to tell Shemp that his uncle had died and left him an inheritance of $500,000. However, Shemp cannot collect the money unless he is married (which horrifies Shemp) within 48 hours after the reading of the will, leaving him only a few hours. Shemp uses his filled-up black address book to propose to any and all women he has ever known, with unsuccessful results. With time running out, Moe and Larry lead Shemp through a series of disastrous situations including the destruction of a phone booth and Shemp being beaten silly by a woman named Miss Hopkins (Christine McIntyre), who had just moved into the building and mistook Shemp for her cousin Basil. Upon recovering from his bruising, Shemp unintentionally proposes to his unattractive and tone-deaf student Miss Dinkelmeyer. Written by Clyde Bruckman. Directed by Edward Bernds. Original air date: September 11, 1947.

  • Sing a Song of Six Pants (Episode 102)

    The Stooges run a tailor shop that is about to be repossessed by the Skin and Flint Finance Corporation. When the Boys hear about a big reward for fugitive bank robber Terry 'Slippery Fingered' Hargan (Harold Brauer), they think that catching him might end their financial woes. Hargan conveniently ducks into their shop as the officer (Vernon Dent) enters and leaves a suit with a safe combination in its pocket. After his girlfriend (Virginia Hunter) fails to retrieve the combination, Hargan returns with his henchmen, and a wild mêlée follows. The Stooges miss out on the reward but wind up with the crook's bankroll to pay off their debts. Written by Felix Adler. Directed by Jules White. Original air date: October 30, 1947.

  • Lions, and gorillas, and kittens, OH MY! Bud Abbott and Lou Costello star in this classic comedy.

    Lions, and gorillas, and kittens, OH MY! Diana Emerson visits the book section of Klopper's Department store looking for a copy of Dark Safari by the famed explorer Cuddleford. She tells the clerk, Buzz Johnson, that she will pay $2,500 for a map that is inside the book. Buzz's friend and co-worker, Stanley Livington, an armchair explorer, has read the book and says he is familiar with a map in it. Buzz brings Stanley to Diana's home to draw the map, but when he overhears Diana offer Clyde Beatty $20,000 to lead an expedition to capture a legendary giant ape, Buzz realizes that the map is worth considerably more than $2,500. Buzz asks for more money and for he and Stanley to join the safari. They travel to the Congo with Diana's team of explorers, including Harry, 'Boots' Wilson, 'Grappler' McCoy and Gunner, a nearsighted professional hunter. When he learns that the expedition's true goal is not the giant ape but a fortune in diamonds, Buzz renegotiates their deal again. However, it turns out that the map in the book that Stanley is familiar with is a map he drew himself of the route to his job at Klopper's. However, Stanley's memory of details in the book bring the party to the region Diana is interested in. A cannibal tribe sets a trail of diamonds to lure Buzz and Stanley and capture them. Cast: Bud Abbott as Buzz Johnson Lou Costello as Stanley Livington Clyde Beatty as himself Frank Buck as himself Max Baer as Grappler McCoy Buddy Baer as Boots Wilson Hillary Brooke as Diana Emerson Shemp Howard as Gunner Joe Besser as Harry Burton Wenland as Bobo Charles Gemora as The Ape Production: Africa Screams was filmed from November 10 through December 22, 1948, at the Nassour Studios in Los Angeles. The film was produced by A&P heir Huntington Hartford. The film was the second of the independently financed productions Abbott and Costello made while they were under contract with Universal, and it was released by United Artists.Clyde Beatty provided his own animals for the film. The subplot regarding the affectionate gorilla originally presented a female simian pursuing Costello. However, the Breen Office censors that enforced the Production Code in Hollywood demanded that the gorilla's gender be changed because they felt a female gorilla's pursuit of a man would be on par with bestiality. Africa Screams marked the first time that Abbott and Costello worked with Hillary Brooke and Joe Besser; both actors would later become part of the ensemble cast for the duo's television series The Abbott and Costello Show. The film also marked the only time that Shemp Howard and Joe Besser appeared together in a film; Besser would replace Howard as one of the Three Stooges following the latter's death in 1955. The film was purchased in 1953 by Robert Haggiag, an independent distributor in New York. Haggiag failed to renew the copyright because he lost interest in the film, and it fell into the public domain in 1977. Author and film historian Bob Furmanek contacted Haggiag in the late 1980s and obtained the original nitrate stock. Most of the original camera negative had decomposed, but the nitrate fine grain was still serviceable and he had it transferred to 35mm for preservation.

     

  • Steamboat Bill, Jr. is a 1928 silent comedy film starring Buster Keaton. Released by United Artists, the film is the final product of Keaton's independent production team and set of gag writers. It was not a box-office success and became the last picture Keaton made for United Artists. Keaton ended up moving to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, where he made one last film in his trademark style, The Cameraman, before his creative control was taken away by the studio. Original release date: May 12, 1928.

    Charles Reisner directed the film, and the credited story writer was Carl Harbaugh. The film, named after Arthur Collins's popular 1911 recording of the 1910 song 'Steamboat Bill', also featured Ernest Torrence, Marion Byron, and Tom Lewis. In 2016, the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress. The film is known for what may be Keaton's most famous film stunt: The facade of an entire house falls all around him while he stands in the perfect spot to pass through the open attic window instead of being flattened.Cast:Buster Keaton as William Canfield, Jr.Ernest Torrence as William 'Steamboat Bill' Canfield, Sr.Marion Byron as Kitty KingTom McGuire as John James KingTom Lewis as Tom Carter

  • The Flying Deuces, also known as Flying Aces, is a 1939 buddy comedy film starring Laurel and Hardy, in which the duo join the French Foreign Legion. It is a partial remake of their short film Beau Hunks (1931). Original release date: November 3, 1939.

    While the boys are vacationing in Paris from working in a fish market in Des Moines, Ollie falls in love with Georgette (Jean Parker), the beautiful daughter of an innkeeper. She turns down his marriage proposal because she is married to a Foreign Legion officer named Francois (Reginald Gardiner). Heartbroken, Ollie contemplates suicide. He is joined by his friend Stan in sinking himself into a river. (In some versions this proceeding is complicated by the presence of an 'escaped shark'.) Stan repeatedly interrupts Ollie as he is about to throw the weight in, and asks him to consider the possibility of reincarnation. Ollie decides his preference is to be reincarnated as a horse. Francois catches sight of them and convinces them to enlist in the Foreign Legion in order to forget Ollie's failed romance (little does Francois know that his wife was the object of Ollie's obsession).

     

    Directed by

    A. Edward Sutherland

     

    Written by

    Ralph Spence, Charley Rogers, Fred Schiller, & Harry Langdon

     

    Produced by

    Boris Morros

     

    Cast

    Stan Laurel as Stan

    Oliver Hardy as Ollie

    Jean Parker as Georgette

    Reginald Gardiner as Francois

    Charles Middleton as Commandant

    Jean Del Val as Sergeant

    Clem Wilenchick as Corporal

    James Finlayson as Jailor

  • Topper Returns is a 1941 fantasy comedy film directed by Roy Del Ruth and written by Jonathan Latimer. The third and final installment in the initial series of supernatural comedy films inspired by the novels of Thorne Smith, it succeeds Topper (1937) and Topper Takes a Trip (1938). Original release date: March 21, 1941.

    As in the prior films, Roland Young plays Cosmo Topper, a mousy banker who gets into trouble because of his ability to see and speak with ghosts, and Billie Burke plays his wife, who is constantly befuddled by his strange antics. The plot revolves around a murder mystery. Joan Blondell portrays a slain woman who seeks out the reluctant Topper and enlists his help in identifying her killer and saving her friend, played by Carole Landis. Most of the action takes place in a spooky mansion filled with eccentric characters, trapdoors and secret passages.

     

    Directed by Roy Del Ruth

    Written by Jonathan Latimer

     

    Cast

    Joan Blondell as Gail Richards

    Roland Young as Cosmo Topper

    Carole Landis as Ann Carrington

    Billie Burke as Clara Topper

    Dennis O'Keefe as Bob

    Patsy Kelly as Emily

    H. B. Warner as Henry Carrington

    Eddie 'Rochester' Anderson as Eddie

    George Zucco as Dr. Jeris

    Donald McBride as Police Sergeant Roberts

    Rafaela Ottiano as Lillian

    Trevor Bardette as Rama

    William O'Brian as unnamed second butler.

The Kid Brother (1927)

The Kid Brother is a 1927 American silent comedy film starring Harold Lloyd. It was successful and popular upon release and today is considered by critics and fans to be one of Lloyd’s best films, integrating elements of comedy, romance, drama, and character development. Its storyline is an homage to a 1921 film called Tol’able David, although it is essentially a re-make of a little-known 1924 Hal Roach feature, The White Sheep, starring Glenn Tryon.

PLOT

The Hickorys are a respected family in Hickoryville. Sheriff Jim and his big, strong sons Leo and Olin have little respect for the youngest son, Harold, who does not have their muscles.

When Jim, Leo and Olin go to an important town meeting to discuss a dam, Harold is left behind. He puts on his father’s gun and badge and is mistaken for the sheriff by “Flash” Farrell, who runs a traveling medicine show for Mary after the death of her father. Farrell talks Harold into signing a permit to let him, strongman Sandoni and dancer Mary perform. Later, Mary tries to avoid the unwanted attentions of Sandoni and encounters Harold. They are attracted to each other.

When Jim finds out that Harold authorized the medicine show, he orders his son to shut down the performance. Harold tries, but Farrell makes a fool of him, then has him tied up. Harold’s sworn enemy, Hank Hooper, pelts him and accidentally starts a fire that consumes the medicine show wagon. Harold invites Mary to spend the night in the family home. Jim is asleep, so Harold cannot get his permission; Harold has to use his wits to overcome the opposition of his brothers. However, Mrs. Hooper and her son Hank show up and take Mary with them, as it would not be decent for Mary to spend the night in a house without “womenfolk”.

The next day is a town celebration, where Jim is supposed to turn over to a state official the funds raised by the residents to help build the dam. However, the money is gone. Jim strongly suspects Farrell and Sandoni of being responsible, but Sam Hooper accuses him of the theft and refuses to let him go after them. Jim sends Leo and Olin, but not Harold, after them. When they return empty-handed, Jim allows himself to be tied up. There is talk of lynching.

Harold confesses to Mary that he is not the person he pretended to be, but she tells him she has faith in him. Then Hank accuses her of being in on the robbery. Harold fights back when some men grab her, only to have Hank knock him out and set him adrift in a rowboat. He awakens after the boat reaches an abandoned, beached ship. Aboard he finds the real thieves. Sandoni disposes of Farrell after they argue over the division of the loot. Then the strongman spots Harold and chases him all over the ship. Eventually, Harold subdues Sandoni and races back to town with his prisoner and the money to save his father. An impressed Jim tells him, “Son, you’re a real Hickory.” As Harold and Mary walk away, they encounter Hank. Harold musters the courage to fight his longtime nemesis and beats him up.

CREATORS

Directed by Ted Wilde, J.A. Howe (co-director), Harold Lloyd,
and Lewis Milestone
Written by Howard J. Green
Produced by Harold Lloyd
Restored and upscaled by moonflix, LLC

CAST

Harold Lloyd as Harold Hickory
Jobyna Ralston as Mary Powers
Walter James as Jim Hickory
Leo Willis as Leo Hickory
Olin Francis as Olin Hickory
Constantine Romanoff as Sandoni
Eddie Boland as “Flash” Farrell
Frank Lanning as Sam Hooper
Ralph Yearsley as Hank Hooper

Original release date:
January 22, 1927

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Genres: New Arrivals, Movies, Comedy & Laughs, 1920's, Romance Films, Silent Films, Silent Films, Romance, American Classics, ALL Movies, Comedy Movies

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